MILLION HOODIES IS A HUMAN RIGHTS MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATION BUILDING NEXT GENERATION LEADERS TO END ANTI-BLACK RACISM AND SYSTEMIC VIOLENCE.

OUR STORY

On February 26, 2012, unarmed Black teenager Trayvon Martin, was shot and killed by a neighborhood watchman in Sanford, Florida simply because he “looked suspicious.” Million Hoodies Movement for Justice formed on March 19, 2012 in response to the media’s failure to adequately report on the events leading to Trayvon’s death. While George Zimmerman remained free, mainstream media failed at covering the story. Million Hoodies successfully helped to generate global support for the arrest of Zimmerman. The death of Trayvon Martin became a national flashpoint and empowered a new generation of youth activism dedicated to make transformative change.

In 2012, Million Hoodies created a new tool to help track and document incidents of police misconduct and has since collected over 2,000 incidents of misconduct in New York City alone. The Million Hoodies national network that exist today officially launched in 2014, designed to develop a new generation of human rights leaders on the front lines for transformative social change. In partnership with ColorofChange.org, Million Hoodies successfully stopped Oklahoma from passing a discriminatory law that would criminalize Black youth from wearing hoodies in public spaces.

WHO WE ARE

Million Hoodies has evolved and grown from its organic beginning into becoming a vibrant political home for youth of color activists capable of shifting the country’s dialogue about safety and effecting transformative change at the state and local level through authentic sustained civic engagement.

Today Million Hoodies is a human rights membership, chapter-based organization whose mission is to build next generation human rights leaders to end anti-black racism and systemic violence. Through transformative leadership development, grassroots organizing, advocacy, and education, Million Hoodies is home to a national network of students and young people of color, committed to building a movement for dignity and democracy where all Black and Brown people have social, political, cultural, economic freedom, and the right to be safe.

The co-founders of Million Hoodies recognized the need to foster the development of young people of color to push back against the criminalization of our communities and systemic violence. At the chapter level, our members engage in local organizing to shape and shift outcomes that directly impact their communities, from launching a sanctuary fund to provide services and support to undocumented students to reimagining college student activism, and campaigning to reinvest in community and divest from policing and other harmful systems.